This year, 2015, marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War’s end. What was accomplished and at what cost? What is the legacy of the conflict that divided a nation? Professor JC Mutchler focuses on the human cost of the conflict, devastating in its magnitude and unprecedented horrors. Vocalists Seth Kershinik, Jenina Gallaway and Vanessa Salaz bring to life the individuals who suffered through the conflict in songs by Carter, Kanter and Kurt Weill.

Gain fundamental tools to reduce stress and make your graduate/professional student career more enjoyable, sustainable and effective. Clinical Psychology graduate student Dev Ashish offers a special introduction and review of literature on Meditation & Awareness. Moderated by UA College of Medicine mind-body researcher Charles Raison, M.D.
 
          • RELAX: Somatic Movement & Stress Reduction with Stuart Moody, M.A., certified Ananda Yoga instructor
          • BREATHE EASY: Science of Breathing with Michael Goldstein, Clinical Psychology graduate student in the sleep and
            psychophysiology laboratories at UA
          • LEARN TO LOVE: Cultivating Compassion for Personal Well-Being with Deanna Kaplan, M.A., Psychology doctoral
            student and President of the Arizona Meditation Research Interest Group.

Free! Space is limited, RSVP is required, please go here.
Undergraduates, save the date! A Student Wellness Conference for all UA students is on Friday, April 17, 3:00pm-5:00pm.
 
Click here for more information about presenters and presentations.
 

Augmented Reality is a relatively new technology that is set to change the way we see the world. Through specialized software and mobile devices, we are now able to digitally tag the world, allowing others to see that which we have left, and in some cases, contribute. This talk will look at how technology, and more specifically, augmented reality and digital video are being used in a short term study abroad experience to Paris, France by a class: “When African-Americans Came to Paris.” Presented by Africana Studies Assistant Professor Bryan Carter, Ph.D.

A four-part series organized by the American Indian Studies Program and the Department of English, featuring four contemporary American Indian writers. The series explores the centrality of water as a physical and metaphorical element in contemporary American Indian writing, and is linked to a graduate seminar in American Indian Studies and the Department of English. All readings are free and open to the public. More information is available here

Poets can’t escape it, songwriters are smitten by it. But what is “IT”? Is “IT” simply chemistry, how does “IT” change with time, and why does “IT” all fall apart? The science and psychology behind Cupid's arrow is examined by Professor David Sbarra in observation of St. Valentine’s Day. Beginning with Cecil Doughtery's witty "Love in the Dictionary," the musical offering is of course, all about romance!

A four-part series organized by the American Indian Studies Program and the Department of English, featuring four contemporary American Indian writers. The series explores the centrality of water as a physical and metaphorical element in contemporary American Indian writing, and is linked to a graduate seminar in American Indian Studies and the Department of English. All readings are free and open to the public. More information is available here

Taking the mutual interrelation between culture and the environment as its object of studyOceans and Deserts spans the sciences and humanities by bringing scholars together to interrogate how these interrelated influences unfold in specific contexts. Its transdisciplinary approach promotes inclusivity and the destabilization of institutional boundaries that enable disciplinary insulation. Oceans and Deserts seeks to render the uniqueness of a given disciplinary approach transparent to other fields, encouraging a more robust dialogue and consequently a more nuanced portrait of the world around us. Keynote speakers: Dr. Joellen Russell, Dept. of Geosciences (University of Arizona) and Dr. Eva Hayward, Dept. of Gender & Women's Studies (University of Arizona). More information is available here.

What does a librarian look like? The librarian stereotype has been popularized in film, television and books, but what are these stereotypes and how did they originate? The way librarians are portrayed is often tied to librarianship being a woman-dominated field with historical expectations for simultaneously serving as stern authority figures but also as caregivers. Nicole Pagowsky and Cindy Elliott, faculty librarians at the UA Main Library, will discuss these stereotypes, their implications and how they diverge from the actual work of the profession.

A four-part series organized by the American Indian Studies Program and the Department of English, featuring four contemporary American Indian writers. The series explores the centrality of water as a physical and metaphorical element in contemporary American Indian writing, and is linked to a graduate seminar in American Indian Studies and the Department of English. All readings are free and open to the public. More information is available here

Once upon a time, men ran things. There were no women on the police force and precious few in professional fields. The ambition of many a girl was to find the perfect man and get married. Then, from the middle of the 20th century, things began to change. American women of the Baby Boomer generation have seen cataclysmic shifts in circumstances, opportunities and attitudes towards life and love. In celebration of National Women’s History Month, the incredible journey is examined in discussion and song, featuring travelers from the fields of journalism, law, medicine and the arts.

In this Miranda Joseph Endowed Lecture, Paul Amar articulates new approaches to the study of sexuality politics and police states, offering new ways to read and to confront emergent forms of global power by examining the pivotal, trendsetting cases of Brazil and Egypt. Addressing gaps in the study of neoliberalism and biopolitics, Amar describes how coercive security operations and cultural rescue campaigns confronting waves of resistance have appropriated progressive, anti-market discourses around morality, sexuality, and labor. More information here. Free & open to the public.

A four-part series organized by the American Indian Studies Program and the Department of English, featuring four contemporary American Indian writers. The series explores the centrality of water as a physical and metaphorical element in contemporary American Indian writing, and is linked to a graduate seminar in American Indian Studies and the Department of English. All readings are free and open to the public. More information is available here

A “Grad Jam” with selected Confluencenter Graduate Fellows, presenting their 2014-2015 projects funded by the center.